MFA|EDA Screening: Bad at Geography with Bill Brown

Please join us this Sunday as we welcome punk/zinester/educator/filmmaker Bill Brown back across the Durham-Chapel Hill boundary line. Bill will be here to present two films that disarmingly challenge American borders, real and imagined.

Sun, Nov 20
6:00pm
@ Unexposed Microcinema
105 Hood St / Suite 5

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Program:
The Other Side
(2006, 40 min, 16 mm)
bbos
 “Rooted in the true sense of “independent” in voice and image, The Other Side is a personal essay documentary imbued with magical landscapes and searing observations softly spoken during the director’s cinematic trek along the United States-Mexican border. Throughout the 2,000-mile journey, Texas-based filmmaker Bill Brown considers the border as an historical and political geography of aspiration, insecurity, and transition. He talks to undocumented immigrants who have risked their lives to cross the border and to border activists whose politics have put them at odds with the guardians of homeland security.” – Film Society of Lincoln Center

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Confederation Park
(1999, 31 min, 16mm)
bbcp

“Bill Brown makes reference to ‘the secret languages of exile,’ and while this reflective, even somber film presents a pastiche of places across Canada where Brown has lived, its real subject is the limits of knowledge. Its long takes are accompanied by verbal meditations on the nation’s recent history, including the separatist bombings in Quebec during the 60s, and the battle between English and French becomes a metaphor for the filmmaker’s divided mind. Brown applies stickers with city names to a huge outdoor map of Canada, his voice-over suggesting that ‘we’ve found our place in the universe’ as a result of the ‘Copernican revolution’ but then the stickers are blown away by the wind. Brown implies that images are insufficient: we need to know their history, their locations, their meaning. But landscapes can’t be fully decoded, nor past events captured on film: in the final shot a woman sings, ‘I don’t know where he’s headin’ for,’ while a car travels in a circle.”– Fred Camper, Chicago Reader.

Note: Unexposed Microcinema has you covered for geography-minded film programming this weekend. Check out the entire schedule.

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